news-details

What next for the Apple iPhone X?David Phelan

So, yesterday's leak that the current iPhone X and iPhone SE are about to be canned came as a surprise. Gordon Kelly wrote about this here on Forbes.

Gordon was also the first to predict the iPhone X will be canceled this fall, about which more in a moment.

But the real surprise was the dropping of the iPhone SE.

But MacRumors has now updated its report and, guess what, Kelly was all over this change, too.

The initial information had come from an analysts' report from BlueFin Research, and which itself had been picked up by Barron's.

Detail of an Apple iPhone SE smartphone, taken on April 10, 2016. (Photo by Neil Godwin/MacLife Magazine via Getty Images)

However, while the original coverage suggested that the iPhone SE, the only iPhone with a 4-inch display left in Apple's portfolio, would be discontinued in the coming months, this has now been corrected.

BlueFin Research has told MacRumors that Barron's had misinterpreted the report and in fact it was the rumored iPhone SE 2 which it was talking about, suggesting that Apple won't now produce the fabled second-generation version of the 4-inch iPhone, claimed to be a model with Face ID built in.

Well, that makes a lot more sense. Many people, myself included, really doubted that such a phone was ever more than a wild musing. The point of the SE is not just that it is compact, but that it is more affordable than most iPhones.

It was, when it launched, a powerful handset, thanks to a processor as potent as its bigger-screened siblings, the iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus. But it lacked other upgrades that had appeared on the 6s such as 3D Touch or a second-generation Touch ID sensor.

And that's the point: Apple kept costs down by not putting the latest components, of which Face ID is certainly one, in the SE. To imagine an SE2 with this capability seemed nuts to me.

MOSCOW, RUSSIA. APRIL 5, 2016. An Apple iPhone 5se at a re:Store shop. Artyom Geodakyan/TASS (Photo by Artyom GeodakyanTASS via Getty Images)

Of course, this doesn't mean the iPhone SE will stay in the range for ever. But at least it seems to be safe for now.

Apple behaving consistently, then.

And I'd say there's also precedent for the other part of the BlueFin Research note, that the iPhone X might be discontinued this year.

Detail of an Apple iPhone X smartphone with a Silver finish, taken on October 27, 2017. (Photo by Neil Godwin/T3 Magazine via Getty Images)

When I talked to Apple exec Phil Schiller before the release of the iPhone X he was clear: "The iPhone 8 is the next generation of what we've been making with iPhone 7, taking a lot of new technologies like a better chip, sound system, better cameras. For what you're used to with iPhone 7, iPhone 8 is the next, better version. Then, iPhone X is something just entirely different. We've added something at the top of the line that is unlike any iPhone before it."

In other words, Apple was encouraging us to see the iPhone X as something separate from the regular sequence.

Well, there's also a recognizable pattern for this development.

Two of the five Apple iPhone 5C colors, taken on September 20, 2013. (Photo by Joby Sessions/MacFormat Magazine via Getty Images)

When Apple released the colorful iPhone 5c in September 2013 it was another thing altogether from the iPhone 5 or iPhone 5s. The iPhone 5c came in 16GB and 32GB storage versions and were discontinued exactly a year later.

They were replaced by an 8GB model which was lower-priced and which, by the bye, saw a huge increase in the 5c's popularity.

But to do the same with the iPhone X seems just inconceivable. The iPhone X is the most premium iPhone ever and to try and make it less premium doesn't quite make sense.

Apple's new iPhone X is displayed after it goes on sale at the Apple Store in Tokyo's Omotesando shopping district, Japan, Feburary 1, 2018. (Photo by Hitoshi Yamada/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Much better, surely, to introduce a wholly different iPhone with Face ID  but which is more affordable than the iPhone X, though not as keenly priced as the iPhone SE. It could have an aluminum frame, say, instead of shiny stainless steel. Or an LCD screen instead of pricier OLED. That's more expensive in terms of R&D for Apple, for sure, but if it's the first of a series of mid-priced iPhones with Face ID it's better in the long run, right?

We're getting nearer to the time when all will be revealed, but I'd say we should expect Apple to behave consistently.

Though probably not predictably.

If you enjoyed this story, you might also like these:

Ten Years Of The Apple App Store: My Ten Favorite Game-Changing Apps

Why The Orange iPhone X Leak Is Real (And Why I Want One)

Apple Builds Next-Gen Apple Maps, 1st Update Coming Soon: Here's Why It's So Important

Week In Wearables: Apple Watch 4 Big Screen Rumor, AirPods 2 Leak, Kids' Smartwatches Coming

Apple Watch Series 4 Rumor: New Watch To Sport Bigger Screen, Brilliant Design

How To Install macOS Mojave 10.14 Public Beta, All The Highlights And Should You Upgrade?

" readability="126.14385420706">

Apple is a company which, though not always predictable, is often highly consistent.

What next for the Apple iPhone X?David Phelan

So, yesterday's leak that the current iPhone X and iPhone SE are about to be canned came as a surprise. Gordon Kelly wrote about this here on Forbes.

Gordon was also the first to predict the iPhone X will be canceled this fall, about which more in a moment.

But the real surprise was the dropping of the iPhone SE.

But MacRumors has now updated its report and, guess what, Kelly was all over this change, too.

The initial information had come from an analysts' report from BlueFin Research, and which itself had been picked up by Barron's.

Detail of an Apple iPhone SE smartphone, taken on April 10, 2016. (Photo by Neil Godwin/MacLife Magazine via Getty Images)

However, while the original coverage suggested that the iPhone SE, the only iPhone with a 4-inch display left in Apple's portfolio, would be discontinued in the coming months, this has now been corrected.

BlueFin Research has told MacRumors that Barron's had misinterpreted the report and in fact it was the rumored iPhone SE 2 which it was talking about, suggesting that Apple won't now produce the fabled second-generation version of the 4-inch iPhone, claimed to be a model with Face ID built in.

Well, that makes a lot more sense. Many people, myself included, really doubted that such a phone was ever more than a wild musing. The point of the SE is not just that it is compact, but that it is more affordable than most iPhones.

It was, when it launched, a powerful handset, thanks to a processor as potent as its bigger-screened siblings, the iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus. But it lacked other upgrades that had appeared on the 6s such as 3D Touch or a second-generation Touch ID sensor.

And that's the point: Apple kept costs down by not putting the latest components, of which Face ID is certainly one, in the SE. To imagine an SE2 with this capability seemed nuts to me.

MOSCOW, RUSSIA. APRIL 5, 2016. An Apple iPhone 5se at a re:Store shop. Artyom Geodakyan/TASS (Photo by Artyom GeodakyanTASS via Getty Images)

Of course, this doesn't mean the iPhone SE will stay in the range for ever. But at least it seems to be safe for now.

Apple behaving consistently, then.

And I'd say there's also precedent for the other part of the BlueFin Research note, that the iPhone X might be discontinued this year.

Detail of an Apple iPhone X smartphone with a Silver finish, taken on October 27, 2017. (Photo by Neil Godwin/T3 Magazine via Getty Images)

When I talked to Apple exec Phil Schiller before the release of the iPhone X he was clear: "The iPhone 8 is the next generation of what we've been making with iPhone 7, taking a lot of new technologies like a better chip, sound system, better cameras. For what you're used to with iPhone 7, iPhone 8 is the next, better version. Then, iPhone X is something just entirely different. We've added something at the top of the line that is unlike any iPhone before it."

In other words, Apple was encouraging us to see the iPhone X as something separate from the regular sequence.

Well, there's also a recognizable pattern for this development.

Two of the five Apple iPhone 5C colors, taken on September 20, 2013. (Photo by Joby Sessions/MacFormat Magazine via Getty Images)

When Apple released the colorful iPhone 5c in September 2013 it was another thing altogether from the iPhone 5 or iPhone 5s. The iPhone 5c came in 16GB and 32GB storage versions and were discontinued exactly a year later.

They were replaced by an 8GB model which was lower-priced and which, by the bye, saw a huge increase in the 5c's popularity.

But to do the same with the iPhone X seems just inconceivable. The iPhone X is the most premium iPhone ever and to try and make it less premium doesn't quite make sense.

Apple's new iPhone X is displayed after it goes on sale at the Apple Store in Tokyo's Omotesando shopping district, Japan, Feburary 1, 2018. (Photo by Hitoshi Yamada/NurPhoto via Getty Images)

Much better, surely, to introduce a wholly different iPhone with Face ID  but which is more affordable than the iPhone X, though not as keenly priced as the iPhone SE. It could have an aluminum frame, say, instead of shiny stainless steel. Or an LCD screen instead of pricier OLED. That's more expensive in terms of R&D for Apple, for sure, but if it's the first of a series of mid-priced iPhones with Face ID it's better in the long run, right?

We're getting nearer to the time when all will be revealed, but I'd say we should expect Apple to behave consistently.

Though probably not predictably.

If you enjoyed this story, you might also like these:

Ten Years Of The Apple App Store: My Ten Favorite Game-Changing Apps

Why The Orange iPhone X Leak Is Real (And Why I Want One)

Apple Builds Next-Gen Apple Maps, 1st Update Coming Soon: Here's Why It's So Important

Week In Wearables: Apple Watch 4 Big Screen Rumor, AirPods 2 Leak, Kids' Smartwatches Coming

Apple Watch Series 4 Rumor: New Watch To Sport Bigger Screen, Brilliant Design

How To Install macOS Mojave 10.14 Public Beta, All The Highlights And Should You Upgrade?

Related Posts